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missing you loved one
Woman missing her loved one

This is something we come across on a fairly regular basis and was reminded again recently by a loving son who was deeply concerned about his widowed Mother and the challenges the family had because his Father didn’t have a Will.

On reflection, if you take into account that over half the adult population in England and Wales do not have an up-to-date Will or a Will at all then you can see why the late Father took his stance, it didn’t seem important to him.

Yes of course, having a Will does make sense because in effect you are having the last say on what you would like to happen to your estate (belongings, money, etc) instead of a Court making decisions on your behalf when unfortunately, it was too late to get to know you as you had already passed away.

Putting our own importance to one side, bear a thought for those whom you would have left behind. 

It can be difficult to judge the impact of friendship or value you may have on someone else’s life and once you have gone, only then, a true realisation of your absence may be felt. 

For those of your friends or family who would be left in this position, having a Will in place would never replace you but it would at least give guidance to your loved ones and significant others about your own thoughts, feelings and wishes.

It is also true to say some of those whom you have left behind maybe misguided in their loyalty as their focus may have been on your assets and not you.  Refreshingly though, in most cases this is not the norm.

You see, it’s not about the money, it’s about the memories and impressions that were made on each other’s lives.

Each and every one of us respond differently to death, particularly when it involves someone that we know, as stated before, you can never be replaced but by at least having a Will in place would help those whom you left behind understand their value in your life.